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How do you remain firm but not destroy relationships with clients and business partners?

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By always drawing a line between business and pleasure, without mixing them.

Report DANIEL's answer

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Hi Joshua, thanks for this question. It is common to come across such scenario in consulting. Firmness is not at all a bad thing. In fact, your client will respect your decision if your firmness is grounded in the right principles. It is important to consider/remember the following: 1. If your client doesn't see the reason behind your firmness, spend time to help them see it. Use data that you used to arrive at your decision. Walk them through your thinking and show them that your decision is truly in their best interest. 2. Be firm but also be genuine. Keep their best interest in mind and show that in your actions. 3. Let little things go - don't burn your bridges over little things. 4. Build trust.

Happy to chat more if you have any questions. Great luck! I am sure you will do great.

Report Jayneel's answer

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Hi Joshua,

Key phrases help you structure your conversation during tough discussions such as 'I understand your point, but how do we meet half way?' or 'what are some cons & things we need to be aware of'.

Also, I like to play out scenarios...'If we do it your way, I see XYZ happening which is a good thing but are you prepared for the tough decisions you'd have to make with ABC'.

Hope that helps! Gitangli

Report Gitangli's answer

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Hello Joshua,

The best way to address this issue is by explaining to your clients/partners the costs and benefits of each approach. For example, you advise them of the consequences of doing things in one particular way and let them reach the conclusion on which approach is better. Or if it is a direct conflict (like price negotiation), explain to them how you be impacted should the terms be unfavorable to you.

Good luck!

Karthik

Report Karthik's answer

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Hello Joshua Make it a point to explain to your clients the reasons for your firmness, they will understand

Report edward's answer

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Know your position in your own mind then be willing to negotiate.

Develop a negotiation with a "target" position and a "floor" position. Your objective is to conclude the negotiation achieving a result as close to the target position as possible while never going beneath the floor.

Courtesy and politeness are mandatory. Avoid confrontations. Do not reveal your strategy in front of the other party except to objectively explain your position in terms of an incremental offer or a counter offer. Excuse yourself for outside caucuses or adjournments whenever it is necessary to study an offer, assess a situation or develop your next move.

It is always best to look at negotiations from a win/win perspective. Be honest and forthright. Look for insights into the other party's negotiation position from the questions being asked, the data being requested or the responses being obtained. Defend your position as conveyed in your proposal with documented facts. Look for openings in the other parties proposal support. Offer compromises and trade-offs of value to the other party in return for acceptance of your position.

Report Kenneth's answer

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